Quick Answer: Are condoms legal in Mexico?

Is contraception illegal in Mexico?

The only legal prohibition related to contraceptive methods in Mexican law is the prohibition against abortion as a method of family planning. regulating all medicines and health products, including contraceptive methods.

How old do you have to be to buy condoms in New Mexico?

You have to be 18 to buy tobacco products or pornography. You DO NOT have to be 18 to buy condoms. You should not get carded for buying condoms and a clerk cannot legally refuse to sell them to you without looking at your ID. A checkout person also shouldn’t ask your age—and if they do, you don’t have to answer.

Is birth control over-the-counter in Mexico?

Context: In Mexico, oral contraceptives (OCs) are available to women over-the-counter in pharmacies. While past research has suggested that nonmedical providers, such as pharmacy workers, are capable of screening women for contraindications to OCs, little is known about their practices.

What birth control is available in Mexico?

CONTEXT: In Mexico, oral contraceptives (OCs) are available to women over-the-counter in pharmacies. While past research has suggested that nonmedical providers, such as pharmacy workers, are capable of screening women for contraindications to OCs, little is known about their practices.

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In what countries is contraception illegal?

Honduras is the only country in Latin America where emergency contraception is banned, forcing desperate women, including rape victims, to buy expensive and unregulated contraband pills on the black market.

How much does a Plan B cost in Mexico?

A month of pills in Mexico costs $4 or $5 US dollars. You can also put together your own ‘Plan B’ dose using Mexican b/c pills (which are made by multi-national companies, the same ones as in the US). Birth control in Mexico is sold without prescription.

Does Mexico sell Plan B pills?

As the United States falters about the distribution of the morning-after pill over the counter, Mexico’s Ministry of Health in this overwhelmingly Catholic country has quietly made it widely available by approving it for sale and then requiring its use in public health clinics.